Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Minimize
IFFF Florida Council - Conservation





For those focused on the environment, there are conservation programs in which you can participate.

In Florida, we promote the IFFF's Mangrove Restoration program and other programs. Many of our programs are partnerships with other organizations and fish & wildlife agencies.

We vigorously defend the Clean Water Act.

Conservation Projects - Reports will be posted regarding new conservation projects by clubs and the IFFF

Hobe Sound NWR Receives Grant for Conservation Ethics Clinic

The International Federation of Fly Fishers (IFFF) has awarded a Small Conservation Grant in the amount of $1,500 that will be matched with an additional $500 grant from the Florida Council of the IFFF to the Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge and Nature Center for a conservation project in the Hobe Sound area. The project will develop and model curriculum and teach a two-day, hands-on conservation ethics clinic for young fly fishers (ages 10-17). The clinic is intended to teach students the skills and enjoyment of fly fishing as a venue for instilling knowledge and understanding of the importance of sound resource conservation and informed uses of these resources for present and future generations. Students will learn skills of fly casting, fly tying and fishing; participate in field projects that include beach cleanups; and gain an understanding of natural systems ecology and conservation in the outdoor setting of the diverse aquatic resources at Hobe Sound NWR.

The conservation benefits that are anticipated to result from completion of the clinic include development of a model curriculum for Conservation Ethics Clinics that may be used by other IFFF Clubs and the Florida Council as a continuing endeavor and a new group of young fly fishers who will enjoy the sport with a strong conservation background and life-long ethic regarding natural resources. The project will also make students aware of advocacy groups, such as the IFFF, who are major voices for sound conservation of fishery resources and their habitats.

 



Tom H. Logan, V.P. Conservation
tomlogan@comcast.net
Phone:    850-942-9776850-942-9776
Cell:        850-212-5396850-212-5396
Visit his website: http://northfloridaflyfishing.com/

Read more about Tom's illustrious career
in the June 2013 issue of the Whiting Farms Newsletter

Download it in PDF Format


Conservation Plan - FL Council Conservation Plan in PDF Format.


Conservation News

Florida Council's Mangrove Coast Fly Fishers Member wins the William T. Hornaday Gold Medal

At the just completed National Boy Scout Jamboree at the Bechtel Reserve Summit in WV, Dr. Robert J. Sousa of Bristol, RI was awarded the William T. Hornaday Gold Medal. This National level award is the most distinguished adult conservation recognition bestowed by the Boy Scouts of America. The Hornaday Gold Medal, first granted in 1914, is the oldest continuous conservation award by any organization in the United States. Dr. Hornaday was director of the NY Zoological Park, founder of the National Zoo in Washington, DC and was a leader in saving the American bison and several other species from extinction. To date, fewer than 55 Gold Medals have been presented with the likes of Aldo Leopold receiving the second medal. It is among the rarest honors in Scouting and is often compared as the Olympic Medal bestowed by the Earth! Recipients must demonstrate unusual service to natural resource conservation and environmental improvement over a sustained period exceeding 20 years. Bob is very likely the first Rhode Islander to ever receive the Hornaday Gold Medal.

Bob, a Vietnam veteran, is a Ph.D. fishery biologist and Certified Fisheries Scientist (American Fisheries Society). He retired from an extensive and productive career spanning more than 30 years with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He was instrumental in the development of the Wallop Breaux amendments to the Sport Fish Restoration Act that provides matching grant funds to states for boating access and fisheries enhancements.

Bob has fly fished in many countries throughout the world and holds several angling world records. Bob is an international subject expert in angling and specifically fly fishing. He has taught many thousands of scouts to cast a fly rod helping them catch their first fish on a fly. His enthusiasm for angling is very catchy!

Bob's passion for fishing means giving back. He has served on the Board of the Future Fisherman Foundation, is a Master Instructor in Massachusetts Aquatic Resources Education Program, a Certified Angler Instructor with the International Game Fish Association and is Vice Chair of the Fishing Committee of Boy Scouts of America.

He continues to be active in helping youth and adults learn the concepts of fishing and conservation. Bob originated the Fly Fishing Merit Badge for BSA and contributes editorially to the Fishing Merit Badge, Wildlife Management Merit Badge and Ranger Fishing Awards. He has written counselor guides for each of these awards. Bob leads the fly fishing venue at National Boy Scout Jamboree and has done so for the past 6-7 Jamborees. He has also participated in teaching fly fishing at several National Order of the Arrow Conferences. Bob has been instrumental at enhancing fly fishing programs at the Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, Northern Tier Canoe Base in Ely, Minnesota and the Sea Base High Adventure camp in Florida. He initiated and taught at BSA Fishing Camp Schools throughout the country.

Using his many years of teaching fly fishing to many thousands of people, his first non-BSA book, Learn to Fly Fish in 24 Hours (McGraw-Hill) was written to take the intimidation factor out of learning this life-long sport. His latest book, 24 Greatest Flies You Don't Leave Home Without (Husking Bee Books), picks up on the same simplicity theme and describes how an angler can catch most fish, most places, most of the time with a few simple fly patterns. Bob's goal is to simplify the lifetime sport and encourage more people to get out of doors and become responsible stewards of our woods and waters.


Conservation Issues and Actions

The following letter in support of the Florida legislative changes proposed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and was supported by IFFF. Tom Logan, Pete Greenan and Tom Gadacz provided testimony and support to classify bonefish and tarpon as gamefish in early 2013. The new rules were adopted and now require changes in Florida statues.



Rule Amendment to Designate Bonefish and Tarpon as Catch-and-Release Species in Florida
A series of workshops were announced to gather public input on potential changes in the tarpon and bonefish rules to make them catch-and-release only fisheries throughout Florida's state and federal waters.


Possible changes included:
*Eliminating the tarpon bag limit and allowing the harvest and possession of a single tarpon in conjunction with a tarpon tag only when in pursuit of an IGFA record
*Modifying the tarpon tag program, including reporting requirements and calendar year, and
*Discontinuing the bonefish tournament exemption permit that allows tournament anglers to temporarily possess bonefish for transport to a tournament scale.
For more info go to FWC

Updated Report on the Rule Amendment: June 28, 2013 By Tom H. Logan, FL Council 1st Vice President of Conservation

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (Commission) staff presented a proposal to the Governor-appointed Commission during their April 17, 2013, meeting for Rule amendments that would designate bonefish and tarpon as catch-and-release species generally because of their high recreational and economic values as game fish. The amendments would require that both species be released at point of capture in the water, excepting that a single tarpon may be taken for International Game Fish Association (IGFA) records under authorization of a special Tarpon Trophy Tag. The Florida Council of International Federation of Fly Fishers (IFFF) evaluated the proposal and generally found the designation of both species consistent with IFFF catch-and-release philosophy and supported the special Tarpon Trophy Tag as a means of limiting "take" of tarpon while enhancing recreational and trophy value of the species.

The Council subsequently submitted a letter of written support (dated April 17, 2013 and shown below) to the Commission for the proposed amendments. Mr. Tom Logan (1st VP and VP of Conservation) and Mr. Tom Gadacz (FL Council President) also attended the April 17 meeting and final public workshop regarding the proposed amendments where the letter was formally submitted and verbal comments were provided during that workshop to further emphasize our support for the catch-and-release amendments as consistent with sound management of these highly valuable sport fishes. Concern was also expressed regarding harmful methods of catch and handling of tarpon during commercial tournaments for the species. Twenty five other presenters also provided unanimous support for the amendments with several commenting negatively regarding conduct of tarpon tournaments.

The Commission voted unanimously to direct staff to bring the proposed catch-and-release amendments, with the special Tarpon Trophy Tag included, to their regularly scheduled meeting in June for final action and approval of the rule amendments for implementation. It was generally understood that the new amendments once approved and implemented would influence positive changes in the conduct of tarpon tournaments.

The Commission met on June 12, 2013, and voted unanimously to approve the proposed rule amendments that will go into effect September 1, 2012, making bonefish and tarpon catch-and-release species in Florida with a special Tarpon Trophy Tag to allow limited "take" of tarpon for IGFA records only
. Captain Pete Greenan (past FL Council President) attended that meeting to provide further comments in support of the Commission action on behalf of the IFFF and the FL Council. Commission staff subsequently is working with the IGFA to propose revised methods for measurement of tarpon that will further minimize handling of the species for trophy records purposes.

The Florida Council of the Federation of Fly Fishers has been monitoring development of these proposed rule changes for tarpon and bonefish fisheries and provided the following comments:

Rule Amendment to Designate Bonefish and Tarpon as Catch-and-Release Species

By

Thomas Gadacz, Council President

 

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission staff presented a proposal to the Governor-appointed Commission during their April 17, 2013, meeting for Rule amendments that would designate bonefish and tarpon as catch-and-release species generally because of their high recreational and economic values as game fish.  The amendments would require that both species be released at point of capture in the water, excepting that a single tarpon may be taken for International Game Fish Association records under authorization of a special Tarpon Trophy Tag.  The Florida Council of IFFF evaluated the proposal and generally found the designation of both species consistent with IFFF catch-and-release philosophy and supported the special Tarpon Trophy Tag as a means of limiting “take” of tarpon while enhancing recreational and trophy value of the species.  The Council subsequently submitted the letter that follows to the Commission as written support of the proposed amendments.  Mr. Tom Logan (1st VP and VP of Conservation) and I also attended the April 17 meeting and final public workshop regarding the proposed amendments where I provided public comments during that workshop to further emphasize our support for the catch-and-release amendments as consistent with sound management of these highly valuable sport fishes.  I also expressed Council concern with catch and handling methods for tarpon during commercial tournaments for the species.  Twenty five other presenters also provided unanimous support for the amendments with several commenting negatively regarding conduct of tarpon tournaments.  The Commission voted unanimously to direct staff to bring the proposed catch-and-release amendments, with the special Tarpon Trophy Tag included, to their regularly scheduled meeting in June for final action and approval of the rule amendments for implementation.  It was generally understood that the new amendments once approved and implemented would influence changes in the positive for conduct of tarpon tournaments.



New Research Shows Fishing Participation Up
Special report reveals decrease in participation churn rate for first time in years
ALEXANDRIA, VA (June 28, 2012) - Fishing remains the most popular recreational activity in the country with more and more people trying out the sport every day according to a new study released this month by the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF) and The Outdoor Foundation. According to the 2012 Special Report on Fishing and Boating, for the first time in the history of the report, fishing added more participants (8.8 million) than it lost (eight million), bringing the total of Americans who fished to 46.2 million, or 16.2 percent of the population.

"We're extremely pleased to see for the first time in several years, more people coming into the sport than dropping out," said RBFF President and CEO Frank Peterson. "This indicates our efforts are positively influencing participation, enticing newcomers and past participants to get out on the water."

"Fishing and boating are among the most important 'gateway' activities that often lead people, especially youth, to pursue other recreation experiences," said Christine Fanning, Executive Director of the Outdoor Foundation. "We're thrilled to partner, once again, with the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation on this important research project."

The fourth annual report provides detailed information on boating and fishing participation by gender, age ethnicity, income, education and geographic region.


KEY FINDINGS

Fishing Participating
* In 2011, 46.2 million Americans participated in fishing (an increase from 45.4 million in 2010).
While eight million participants stopped fishing, 8.8 million former or new participants joined the sport, netting an increase in overall participation.
* Although the number of fishing participants increased, the number of fishing outings decreased (average of 18.2 days fishing in 2011 compared to average of 20.4 days fishing in 2010).
* Females and youths ages six to 12 added the most new fishing participants.
* Adults 18 and older with children in their households participate in fishing at higher levels than adults without children.
* Findings also indicate that fly fishing has the greatest amount of interest among newcomers, while saltwater fishing holds the interest of participants from youth through adolescence.

Hispanic American Fishing Participation
* 3.1 million Hispanic Americans participated in fishing in 2011 - a slight decrease from 3.4 million in 2010.
* Freshwater fishing is, by far, the most popular type of fishing among Hispanic Americans.
* Hispanic Americans fish the most often out of any fishing category or demographic group, averaging 20 fishing days per year.

Youth Fishing Participation
* Typical of outdoor activities, fishing participation rates peak between the ages of six and 12 and then decrease during the adolescent years from 13 to 17.
* 81.8 percent of fishing participants ages six to 12 are introduced to outdoor activities by their parents.
* Almost 44 percent of youth fishing participants ages six to 17 also participate in boating.

Boating Participation
* The average number of outings per boater increased from 13.2 annual outings in 2010, to 14 annual outings in 2011.
* Fishing from a boat is the most popular activity among males over the age of 16 with 64 percent participation.
* Multispecies boats surpassed bass boat as the most popular boat type at 26 percent for multispecies, followed by bass boat at 16.3 percent.
* The social aspect of boating is notable with 63% of boating participants reporting they get on the water with friends.

"Increased participation leads to increased fishing license sales and boat registration renewals, both key sources for funding state fish and wildlife conservation, and boating infrastructure programs," added Peterson. "We hope to keep the momentum going so the joys of fishing and boating can be experienced by generations to come."

The methodology and full study is available online at RBFF.org.

About RBFF
RBFF is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to increase participation in recreational angling and boating, thereby protecting and restoring the nation's aquatic natural resources. RBFF helps people discover, share and protect the legacy of boating and fishing through national outreach programs including the Take Me Fishing™ campaign and Anglers' Legacy



The Federation of Fly Fishers - Florida Council's comments regarding changing harvest regulations for REDFISH in PDF Format


Resources   |   Membership   |   Conservation   |   Casting   |   Tying   |   Councils   |   Store   |   Fly Fishing Fair   |   Events   |   About
Website by Jeff Reed
5237 U.S. Highway 89 South, Suite 11 Livingston, Montana 59047 406-222-9369    web@fedflyfishers.org